Category Archives: Modellflug

DIY FrSky Horus X10(s) Car Charger

For those familiar with electronics, this is the short version: Connect a 12V cigarette lighter adapter to one and a barrel plug to the other side of a step-up converter and your car charger is done. For more details, read on…

The X10(s) comes with a wall charger and a 2S 7.2V 2600mAh Li-ion Battery. If the battery is not fully charged, and sometimes even if it is, the transmitter (TX) might not get through an entire day of slope flying. So here is a way to charge it through a 12V cigarette lighter adapter or your 12V DC power supply unit.

This solution does not call for any “invasive” mods like soldering inside the TX, drilling the TX housing, changing battery chemistry and so on.

One side note: The FrSky “Wall Charger” is not a charger with all the charging intelligence and algorithms inside it but only an AC-DC converter providing a constant 15V 1A output. The charging intelligence is on a printed circuit board (PCB) attached to the Li-ion battery inside the radio and it decides how much charging power is coming through and when to stop. In other words, all we need to do to have our car “charger” is to put together a device which provides 1A at 15V.

The main component is a so-called step-up volt converter which is sold on eBay for little money. There are many models, some with a LED volt display. The one I bought is simple, cheap and small:

The step-up converter I chose increases voltage from 3-24V input to 5-28V output and can provide up to 2A. It is important to note, that it can only increase the voltage and not reduce it. So if we need a 15V output to charge the X10(s), this specific converter needs an input between 3V and 15V. In my case, I will use the car battery as a power supply.

Components used:

  • 1 Step up volt converter
  • 1 Car lighter adapter for banana plugs
  • 1 Set of banana plugs
  • 1 Barrel plug: 1.7mm inside, 4mm outside, plugs into the X10(s)
  • Cable, shrink tubing and a couple of plugs

Optional: Instead of using a new barrel plug, you can cut off the one at the standard wall charger and connect it back using a plug (e.g. XT30, but almost anything will do). That plug would then also be used to connect the step up volt converter.


I would like to thank James Mills and Colan Casey who helped through FB. 

Flying at Monte Morcia

The actual flying place is called “La Bandita” on Monte Morcia in Marche. For some unknown reasons, modellers refer to it as Monte Catria in Umbria (even Monte Catria is in Marche). Interesting piece of trivia.

I enjoyed two days of excellent flying conditions. This is the best place for alpine model RC soaring I know.

Monte Baldo to Monte Altissimo

Monte Baldo 1752m -> Bocca di Navene 1425m -> Monte Laste 1941m -> Monte Altissimo 2079m -> Refugio Graziani 1650m -> Bocca di Navene 1425m ->Monte Baldo 1752m
17.5 km, 1000m up & down

A long hike to one of the highest peaks in the region, Monte Altissimo, 2079m.

I was a bit skeptical, when Philippe said he would come along and particularly when he planed to schlepp around his airplanes 800m of altitude up and down, which, in the end, turned out to be about 1000m. I am a hard-core hiker and walk this distance and height once a while, but not with a 10kg bag containing, among others two inconvenient 1.5m wings! It is rather a crazy attempt, I thought. But he was ready and passionate enough, so off we went.

First we went up to 1752m by a tele-cabin to Monte Baldo (no sweat : ), then on foot down to Bocca di Navene, 1425m. The first part was a wide open path but soon lead into a hiking path in the forest. The tree branches hanged so low that Philippe had to carry his 2-meter long airplane bag sideways on the rather slippery rocky path.

After a short break at the friendly restaurant at Bocca di Navene, the 600m ascent waited for us.

A short car road and then up again into the low-hanging forest path. The same exercise: Philippe carried his bag sideway and braved up to the rather steep hill.  We could see soon the open area of 45-degree slope of grass and scattered rocks. It is sunny Sunday and lots of rather loud-speaking Italian hikers are on the path as well.

We are walking along a cliff which drops straight down to the Lake Garda, fantastic views as a reward for the effort.

At Mount Laste Philippe found a good spot and wind, and decided to test his airplane Shinto (a crazy Japanese name for an airplane!).  It was not bad apparently but the scattered stones made his airplane landing rather unsafe.

After a simple cheese-bread sandwiches on the slope, we decided to go up to Mt. Altissimo. Relatively soon we were on the large boulder of Mt. Altissimo and joined a lot of hikers who came from the opposite direction – where the car park isn’t far.

We enjoyed a sweeping view of Lake Garda (but not Dolomitens, due to the clouds) and had to head back down, because Philippe thought that we otherwise may miss the last tele-cabin back down to Malescine!

Our way back was not easy. 800m down and then again the last stretch of 300m uphill again!

Uff…

Monte Baldo Modell Glider Flying

Getting up to the Monte Baldo (1752m) from the lake side is easy. The Funivie (Cabin) brings me up to the top and another 10 minutes of walking to the flying spot “Colma di Malcesine”. A huge mountain shoulder with enough space to land even the biggest models.

A fellow model glider pilot told me that he was able to fly DS with speeds up to 350km/h at one end of the shoulder. But as it is easy to get up, the many day tourists make safe dynamic soaring possible only after the last cabin has gone down.

For me it was pleasant thermal flying and safe landing against the slope with a Shinto J and a Thermik XXXL.

Xmodels Swift-S1 FES, 3.20m

Allgemeines
Modelltyp: Segelkunstflug
Masstab: 1:4, Scalemodell
Ausführung:  Voll-Gfk/Cfk, HS-Version
Fabrikat:  xmodels.it
Bezug: leomotion.com

Technik
Spannweite: 3.20m
Länge: 1.74m
Abfluggewicht: 6,736kg
Schwerpunkt: 100mm (kein Trimmblei notwendig)
Sonstiges: Flitschenhaken
Spezielles: IDS-Anlenkungen (Tragflächen)
Fes-Antrieb (Getriebe): LEO 4031-2550, (6.7:1)
Klapppropeller: RFM-Cfk17x13″, weiss
Spinner: RFM-Cfk-Scale, 45mm/6mm
BEC-Regler: Hobbywing Platinum Pro 120A Platinum HV V4
High Voltage
Kabinenhaube: Klappbar wie beim Original!

Radio/RC FrSky
Sender: FrSky X12s
Sender Programmiervorlage: Mike Shellim F3F Slope Racer
Empfänger/RX: FrSky-X 8 R
Sensor: UniSens-E, SM Modellbau
Akku Antrieb: 6S-Lipo, 4’500mAh/22,2V/40C
Stützakku RX:  OptiPower Ultra-Guard 430

Servos Futaba/MKS HV
Höhenruder: MKS HV747, 13.8kg.cm/7,2V
Seitenruder: MKS HV747, 13.8kg.cm/7,2V
Querruder: S3173SVi, 4,3kg.cm/7,4V
Wölbklappen: BLS173SVi, 7,6kg.cm/7,4V

Leergewichte:
Rumpf/Haube/Seite: 1’720g
Cfk-Steckung:    286g
Höhenleitwerk:    218g
Tragflächen: 2’540g
Total 4’764g

CMS Modellflugzeuge

Modellsegelflug auf der Alp Valpun – Target F3B

Das War ein wahnsinns Modellsegelflugtag. Am morgen verhiess der verhangene Himmel nichts gutes. Die Sonne drückte nur manchmal durch. Aber ich war guten Mutes und stieg die 40 Minuten auf die Krete unterhalb des “Chrüz”, dem Panyer Hausberg. Das hat sich gelohnt – und wie. Ein wenig Ballast in die Flügel und ab ging’s. Beste Konditionen mit schönem Hangwind und dramatischer Kulisse mit Sicht auf das ganze Prättigau und die Fideriser Heuberge. Ein Traum.